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Medicaid Cut for Podiatry in AZ

I was saddened to see this article in the last ACFAS emailer.


Medicaid Cut for Podiatry in AZ

Health benefits for adults enrolled in Arizona's Medicaid program are being significantly scaled back. Coverage will be cut for basic health services, including podiatry. Additionally, the state will cut benefits for medical equipment, including computer-controlled lower limbs and joints.

From "Health Benefits Cut for Adults With Medicaid"
Arizona Republic (AZ) (09/26/10) Alltucker, Ken


MEMBER COMMENTS
Re: Medicaid Cut for Podiatry in AZ

And of all states - Arizona! It is a double insult to have podiatry benefits cut in Arizona where David Armstrong and Kathleen Stone and Robert Frykberg are located. As well as one of the best educational conferences - the Desert Foot Conference.

They have done all they can do to prevent this and their hard work speaks for itself. It is just a sad, sad shame. Limbs will, of course, be lost as a result and then we will see the real financial and human costs of this bad decision.

Re: Medicaid Cut for Podiatry in AZ
Quote:

I was saddened to see this article in the last ACFAS emailer.


Medicaid Cut for Podiatry in AZ

Health benefits for adults enrolled in Arizona's Medicaid program are being significantly scaled back. Coverage will be cut for basic health services, including podiatry. Additionally, the state will cut benefits for medical equipment, including computer-controlled lower limbs and joints.

From "Health Benefits Cut for Adults With Medicaid"
Arizona Republic (AZ) (09/26/10) Alltucker, Ken



Wow;  these things never ceases to surprise me.  We were facing a similar cut in Virginia but were able to successfully defeat the measure following an intensive period of copious letter-writing and phone calls.  The VPMA sponsored an event in which we all came to Richmond to meet with law-makers to educate them our on training, background, and the importance of podiatric medicine in preventative measures.  Perhaps Arizona can rally together and turn this around....

Re: Medicaid Cut for Podiatry in AZ

well everyone, it just goes to show you that in part, its always 'Life Over Limb".

 

You dont think that the cardiologists would tolerate a cut like that do you?

Re: Re: Medicaid Cut for Podiatry in AZ
Quote:

well everyone, it just goes to show you that in part, its always 'Life Over Limb".

 

You dont think that the cardiologists would tolerate a cut like that do you?



Yes, but Eric I'm not sure that what you say is true, i.e. "Life Over Limb" because of the morbidity and mortality statistics after amputation. Loss of limb, leads to loss of life.

I wonder how many limbs will be amputated, resulting in increased cardiovascular impact, leading to death before the fiscal managers and politicians will take notice and restore these Medicare cuts to the budget. I just wrote something on eTalk about the supposedly ideal healthcare system in Colorado. I'm not so sure that it is ideal either.

It limits visits to specialists and reinstores the gatekeeper system. I believe that podiatrists should be seen as primary care providers in this sense and not as specialists. We are the primary care providers for the feet, especially in the diabetic population.

It is a sad, sad day.

Re: Re: Re: Medicaid Cut for Podiatry in AZ
Quote:

Quote:

well everyone, it just goes to show you that in part, its always 'Life Over Limb".

 

You dont think that the cardiologists would tolerate a cut like that do you?



Yes, but Eric I'm not sure that what you say is true, i.e. "Life Over Limb" because of the morbidity and mortality statistics after amputation. Loss of limb, leads to loss of life.

I wonder how many limbs will be amputated, resulting in increased cardiovascular impact, leading to death before the fiscal managers and politicians will take notice and restore these Medicare cuts to the budget. I just wrote something on eTalk about the supposedly ideal healthcare system in Colorado. I'm not so sure that it is ideal either.

It limits visits to specialists and reinstores the gatekeeper system. I believe that podiatrists should be seen as primary care providers in this sense and not as specialists. We are the primary care providers for the feet, especially in the diabetic population.

It is a sad, sad day.


In Virginia, they held a series of budget meetings in several key cities throughout the Commonwealth where citizens were able to speak regarding the proposed budget cuts.  I spoke at one of the meetings regarding the expense of amputation and the cost savings associated with preventative diabetic screenings.  Ultimately we were able to demonstrate that cutting podiatry services were not truly a cost-savings when you consider the direct and indirect costs of the development of lower extremity ulcerations and amputations.

Re: Medicaid Cut for Podiatry in AZ

Quote: 

I was saddened to see this article in the last ACFAS emailer.


Medicaid Cut for Podiatry in AZ

Health benefits for adults enrolled in Arizona's Medicaid program are being significantly scaled back. Coverage will be cut for basic health services, including podiatry. Additionally, the state will cut benefits for medical equipment, including computer-controlled lower limbs and joints.

From "Health Benefits Cut for Adults With Medicaid" 
Arizona Republic (AZ) (09/26/10) Alltucker, Ken

I would be interested to hear from some Arizona Podiatrist on this important, but sad development.  So my question is, if you take call or consults at the hospital you still have to see these patients in the ER/floor because of hospital bylaws.  But what then if they require intervention?  Do you continue to see the patient knowing the the new status of Medicaid in Arizona or do you consult Orthopedics, General Surgery, Plastics, ect for intervention.  A move like that can only hurt your position in that marker place and the diminish the over all perception of the Podiatric profession in that state.  

I wonder where the APMA and the Arizona Podiatry Association are with this important issue.  I do not know of the number of Podiatrist in Arizona or how many are in the state association, but this is a good example of the need for a strong state association - only from numbers.  In Florida, mainly with a strong state association and support from the members and a lot of hard work from the state officers, we defeated an Orthopedic driven measure two years in a row that was an attempt to decrease the scope of Podiatry.

Karr 

Re: Medicaid Cut for Podiatry in AZ

I'm not sure what the law is in Arizona but in California, where we've also been removed from Medicaid (Medical here), podiatrists may see patients and perform surgery in emergent situations only.  For example, if I'm consulted for a fracture on  a patient in the ER I can see that patient and do surgery that same day.  Their follow-up outside of the global period would not be covered by Medical.  If I decided to wait and do the surgery outside of the emergent hospitalization period the procedure would not be covered by Medical.  Ridiculous.

Re: Re: Medicaid Cut for Podiatry in AZ
Quote:

Quote: 

I was saddened to see this article in the last ACFAS emailer.


Medicaid Cut for Podiatry in AZ

Health benefits for adults enrolled in Arizona's Medicaid program are being significantly scaled back. Coverage will be cut for basic health services, including podiatry. Additionally, the state will cut benefits for medical equipment, including computer-controlled lower limbs and joints.

From "Health Benefits Cut for Adults With Medicaid" 
Arizona Republic (AZ) (09/26/10) Alltucker, Ken

I would be interested to hear from some Arizona Podiatrist on this important, but sad development.  So my question is, if you take call or consults at the hospital you still have to see these patients in the ER/floor because of hospital bylaws.  But what then if they require intervention?  Do you continue to see the patient knowing the the new status of Medicaid in Arizona or do you consult Orthopedics, General Surgery, Plastics, ect for intervention.  A move like that can only hurt your position in that marker place and the diminish the over all perception of the Podiatric profession in that state.  

I wonder where the APMA and the Arizona Podiatry Association are with this important issue.  I do not know of the number of Podiatrist in Arizona or how many are in the state association, but this is a good example of the need for a strong state association - only from numbers.  In Florida, mainly with a strong state association and support from the members and a lot of hard work from the state officers, we defeated an Orthopedic driven measure two years in a row that was an attempt to decrease the scope of Podiatry.

Karr 

 

The APMA helped to play a major role here in Virginia to help hold off the budget cuts that we were facing.  The worked in conjunction with the VPMA, and were able to set up the eAdvocacy website to allow us to contact state representatives directly and to rapidly spread appropriate information regarding the importance of our profession and our role as lower extremity specialists.

Re: Re: Re: Medicaid Cut for Podiatry in AZ

The APMA helped to play a major role here in Virginia to help hold off the budget cuts that we were facing.  The worked in conjunction with the VPMA, and were able to set up the eAdvocacy website to allow us to contact state representatives directly and to rapidly spread appropriate information regarding the importance of our profession and our role as lower extremity specialists.


Ryan,

 

Recently, Dr. Terrence McDonald, President of FPMA, delivered an address that really showed how much the FPMA is involved with the state legislature and with the state budget.  Podiatry was slated to be cut from the Agency for Healthcare Administration's budget for 2011, but the FPMA stepped in and we were able to avoid being cut from Florida Medicaid services.

 

IT really just sometimes depends on how strong of a lobby the state organization can put forth at the governmental level.  Unfortunately, medicine and politics do not always see things the same way, if ever.

 

I am just glad (even though I do not see a ton of Medicaid recipients) that podiatry services in Florida survived another budget cut through the dedicated work of those at the FPMA.

 

Eric